Weekly WordBytes: 3.24.17

Weekly WordBytes: 3.24.17

Ever feel like you’re on information overload? Finding the time to keep up-to-date on industry trends and tips can be challenging. Check-in with us each week as we share our top five must-reads in PR and marketing.

In this Google- and smartphone-era, many of us have grown lazy in remembering details. There was a time when I had so many phone numbers memorized! In his new book, Learn Better, author Ulrich Boser explores ways in which we can boost our memory and improve skills. Read his interview with Olga Khazan (The Atlantic) here:  How to Learn New Things as an Adult.

Does it feel like your to-do list controls your life? Delia Lloyd offers some practical tips for helping you gain back that control: Five Ways to Get On Top of Your To-Do List

It’s always a good idea to keep your grammar refreshed, particularly for those who write for a career: 10 “Spring Cleaning’ AP Style Tips. 

When you’re a solopreneur, it can be hard to not only keep track of goals, but also to be accountable for meeting those goals. Consultant Abby M. Herman motivates us to find ways to achieve those goals: How to Hold Yourself Accountable for Gettin’ it Done.

This week’s ICYMI covers one of my favorite topics, using storytelling to sell, inform, and do just about anything for your company. Don’t miss 5 Storytelling Techniques to Give Business Communications Liftoff

Happy Reading!

 

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Weekly WordBytes: 3.17.17

Weekly WordBytes: 3.17.17

Ever feel like you’re on information overload? Finding the time to keep up-to-date on industry trends and tips can be challenging. Check-in with us each week as we share our top five must-reads in PR and marketing.

If you don’t already follow social media guru Rebekah Radice, add her blog to your must-read list! http://rebekahradice.com/small-business-strategies-to-get-noticed-on-social-media

Public speaking can be nerve-wracking for a variety of reasons. In Women@Forbes this week, Lisa Rabasca Roepe helps readers conquer one major challenge – creating a tangible connection with your audience: 6 Ways To Connect With Your Audience During A Presentation. 

Tracking results via Google Analytics can be beneficial when trying to understand your audience, but the tool can be difficult to navigate at first. Here are a few reports to pay attention to: Google Analytics: 5 Reports You Need to Know About.

How many of us have been distracted by the lists of things successful people do? In Harvard Business Review this week, Emre Soyer and Robin M. Hogarth explain how to be mindful of our own experiences: Stop Reading Lists of Things Successful People Do.

In this week’s ICYMI, the team at The Marketing Zen Group share their tips for writing catchy headlines: 11 Hot Headline Tricks You Can Steal from the Pros.

Happy Reading!

 

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Weekly WordBytes: 3.10.17

Weekly WordBytes: 3.10.17

Ever feel like you’re on information overload? Finding the time to keep up-to-date on industry trends and tips can be challenging. Check-in with us each week as we share our top five must-reads in PR and marketing.

Many small businesses engage in marketing and public relations efforts sporadically, as resources and time permit. Start with a simple strategy focusing on a few key elements. Read HubSpot‘s Beginner’s Guide to Small Business Marketing for some tips.

Having tried several note-taking apps, I still fall back on using pen and paper. Learn why note-taking helps focus the mind and get some tips on how to effectively do so Why People Who Take Notes All the Time Are More Likely To Be Successful

As we celebrate International Women’s Day this year, here is a must-view playlist of TED talks from leaders such as Madeline Albright, Sheryl Sandberg, Shonda Rimes, and more: TED Talks by Strong Women Leaders.  

Apres Group compiled a great list of must-read books to inspire us all in continuing the push for diversity in the workplace and equal rights: These Books Inspire Us to #BeBoldForChange.

Have you read Adam Grant’s book Give and Take?This week’s ICYMI link is for Grant’s TED talk explaining the concept of helping others in order to drive your own success.

Happy Reading!

 

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Weekly WordBytes: 3.3.17

Weekly WordBytes: 3.3.17

Ever feel like you’re on information overload? Working in time to keep up-to-date on industry trends and tips can be challenging. Check-in with us each week as we share our top five must-reads in PR and marketing.

This week’s must-reads:
If you need a reason to incorporate video into your PR and marketing strategies, Roshni Hannon of Mad Bear Productions offers convincing data to so: Video: The Ultimate Sales Tool.

Pooja Krishna, co-founder of Maroon Oak, shares shares her thoughts on effectively using social media for small businesses in 9 Social Media Myths Hurting Your Business.

Navigating the world of social media can be a difficult task for small businesses. Alex York of Sprout Social recaps the latest statistics making it easier for small businesses to create an effective, relevant social media strategy: 47 Social Media Statistics to Bookmark for 2017.

Storytelling is the heart of any PR strategy. Maren Kate Donovan of Inde + Co emphasizes the importance of using the right words to convey meaning and create a connection with you clients Hotel Case Study: The Importance of Copywriting + Design.

What does it take get your message to go viral? Ximena N. Larkin, founder of C1 Revolution, shares her tips on forging the right relationships and designing effective visuals: Harry Potter, yoga and beer: A magical PR and marketing spell.

Happy Reading!

 

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Get to Know: Amruta Houde, Public Health Advocate

Get to Know: Amruta Houde, Public Health Advocate

Indians and Indian Americans have long been known for their success across a wide range of fields in the United States. Amruta Houde and Niraj Antani are two young Indian Americans making a mark and paving the way for others to join them in their quest to serve and positively impact their community.

Learn more about what drives these impressive individuals to serve their communities.

Amruta HoudeGet to Know:
Amruta Houde,
Public Health Advocate

By Rina Shah, The Arpan Group

Volunteering comes second nature to Amruta Houde, a young Indian American pursuing her graduate studies at Columbia University in New York. At a young age, Houde, alongside her family, spent countless volunteer hours with organizations such as Sewa International and The Bhutanese Empowerment Project. While working closely with refugee communities as well as young adolescent girls in rural areas, Houde recognized the importance of information sharing, especially with regard to public health issues.

Born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, Houde has been a volunteer with various community organizations, including Sewa International, since she was in high school. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Georgia Tech and Master of Science in Psychology from Boston University. During a gap year after earning her Master’s, Houde volunteered with Sewa International in India where she worked with local NGO partners in rural communities to share health information. Her experience during this time inspired her to consider a career in public health, and she is now pursuing her Master of Science in Public Health from Columbia University.

In speaking with Houde, her desire to be an advocate for the Indian American community as well as to influence public health policy globally are abundantly clear. Her enthusiasm and dedication are an inspiration for all who wish to be actively involved in bringing about change on all levels – local, national, and international.

Learn more about how Amruta hopes to make an impact in the public health field in her post-graduate career.

What are some of the public health challenges faced by the communities in which you worked in India? How do organizations like Sewa International make a difference on local and national levels?

The public health challenges I observed in India were related to adolescent girl’s health, which naturally influences their development and access to opportunities. Millions of girls are not receiving comprehensive, accurate health education in school or at home. I spent time in Assam and Hyderabad where Seva Bharati, a partner NGO, conducts weekly sessions and camps for teenage girls. They have created a system where girls become “older sisters” and conduct confidence building activities and health education sessions. Another major concern is lack of adequate bathroom facilities for girls in schools which results in a significant school drop-out rate of female students and teachers. Seva Kirana, a partner NGO based in Bengaluru, is working to increase the female literacy rate by building clean toilets in schools and slums.

What are some challenges you faced while working with local NGOs in India?

As I traveled around to various states in India, I noticed that many NGOs are doing similar work in their local areas. However, there is little to no communication or exchange of resources between these organizations. During my time visiting various organizations around the country, I was able to serve as the connection and share project ideas and health education materials. Strengthening the network of NGOs would allow volunteers to learn the best practices from each other.

Get to Know: Amruta Houde, Public Health Advocate
How has your experience as a first-generation Indian American shaped the way you approach your work?

Most of my previous visits to India involved visiting relatives, shopping, and visiting famous landmarks. Experiencing India outside of the tourist context allowed me to truly understand my roots. Understanding the culture of a community is vital to serve. In the U.S., it is important for our community to have representation in various spheres, from healthcare to education to government. As a public health professional, I aim to serve as a voice and advocate for the Indian-American community.


A year-long study abroad or gap year spent volunteering can be eye-opening and influential in many ways. How did your gap year shape your decisions? Why would you recommend college students/recent graduates consider a gap year?

The most common reactions after telling someone you are taking a gap year are “Won’t this set you back in your career plan?” and “Wow, that’s so cool!” I completed my Master’s in Psychology two weeks before I left for India with plans of returning and doing my Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. All the projects I worked on in India happened to be related to public health. If I hadn’t taken this gap year, I may have never realized that public health was my true passion. As for the second reaction, yes, it is an extremely exciting time! But there is another side to it as I saw the reality of the world around me and my true self.

Where do you see yourself in the next five years? What type of work would you like do once you graduate?

After completing my Master’s, I hope to continue in the field of global mental health. Mental health is a topic treated with caution and often avoidance. Through public health policy and programs in the community, I hope to increase awareness about mental health conditions, increase access to mental health resources, and in turn, decrease stigma.

Who has played a crucial role in influencing the events of your life? How so?

As the years go by, I realize more and more that my parents played the most crucial role in shaping who I am today. I observed my parents juggle their careers, family life, and community service throughout my life. More often than not, serving others became the priority. They always reminded me that it was my duty to step outside of my bubble and use the time, resources, and knowledge that I have to selflessly serve all those around me.

Increasingly today, younger generations in the South Asian community are choosing “non-traditional” careers. What words of wisdom do you have for those, particularly young women, who aspire to pursue their interests and embrace an entrepreneurial spirit?

There are many points where we have to decide to take a chance on doing something new or not. Take your time to make a decision and evaluate all the possibilities. But once you’ve made a decision, go all in. Do not doubt what you’ve done. If you continue to doubt yourself, you can never be completely committed to your decision. Sometimes things may not go the way that you’ve planned, but this is not failure. You’ve simply gained something out of the decision that you weren’t expecting. Each experience is a learning experience, it’s in our hands to reflect upon this and develop.

All photographs provided by Amruta Houde.

Article appears in February 2017 issue of Desh-Videsh magazine.

Rina Shah

About the Author
Rina Shah is the CEO and founder of The Arpan Group, a boutique ad agency and public relations firm that specializes in capturing untouched ethnic markets. From press releases and media kits to marketing materials and by-line articles, The Arpan Group customizes solutions based on the client’s needs. For more information, visit www.thearpangroup.com or call (703) 651-6670.

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